ReNEWU Post Natal Mom Jocelyn

Jocelyn began with Hayden Fitness Studio in December 2013 after the birth of her second child, six weeks post natal. Weight 180 pounds. She attended HF monthly two sessions per week in Mommylicious/Fitlicious.

January 16, 2014

March 15, 2014

May 13, 2014~ 175 pounds

6 months after joining Hayden Fitness Studio MUDD SWEAT TEARS

6 months after joining Hayden Fitness Studio
MUDD SWEAT TEARS (Jocelyn is far right two in complete with a smile)

September 24  ,2014 ~168 pounds

December 1, 2014~156 pounds

Year~2014 January 16 March 13 May 13 July 29 September 24 December 1

 

Weight 180 pounds 168 pounds 156 pounds
Shoulders . 45 44.5 44.5 42.5 43 41.25
Chest at nipple 42.5 41.5 41.5 38.5 39 38.5
Bicep Right 13.5 13 13 11.5 12 12.5
Bicep Left 13 13 13 12 12 12
Quad Left 22.25 22 22 21.5 22 22

 

Quad Right 23 21.75 22.5 21 22 22
 Hips 44 42 42 41 42 41
Calves Left 15.75 16 16 14.5 16 16
Calves Right 16.5 17 17 15 16

 

16.5
Waist at

bb

42 39 38 35.5 35 35
Waist below bb 41.25

 

 

41 40 40 39 39

 

 

Pre pregnancy Jocelyn was 156 pounds. Jocelyn attended HF two sessions per week until May/June 2015. She also was trail running until April, 2015 until sore hips, pelvis and small tear took her away to rest. (approx 26 weeks) This was  baby number three delivered at 37 weeks. At 35 weeks Jocelyn weighed 199 pounds.

October 2015~Returned to HF 5 weeks post natal midwife approval

November 5, 2015~182 pounds

Jocelyn December 2015 Snowshoeing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

December 2015 Snowshoeing

January 4~Started ReNEWU 12 week meal plan

January 14, 2016~170 pounds

 

Year~

2015-2016

November 5 2015 January 14 2016 February 2016 March 2016
Weight 182 pounds 170 pounds
Shoulders 43 43
Chest at nipple 42 41
Bicep Right 13 13.5
Bicep Left 13.5 13.5
Quad Left 23.5 22
Quad Right 23 23
 Hips 45.5 44
Calves Left 21 16
Calves Right 25.5 16.5
Waist at

bb

39 39
Waist below bb 43.5 41
Jocelyn back trail running ~January 23, 2016 ~21 weeks post natal

Jocelyn back trail running
~January 23, 2016
~21 weeks post natal

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stay tuned to hear more about Jocelyn’s progress since starting the ReNEWU meal plan.

Nourishing the New Mom

Nourishing the New Mom

I have a special place in my heart for this phase of life. This is where it all begins, in utero, and then during those first precious days and weeks spent nursing while gazing into your little miracle.
Making milk is truly amazing. I remember the first sensations of my milk coming in with my firstborn, and then the gulping, eyes rolling back…”punch drunk on mommy’s milk” Tom would say.
I didn’t know I had it so easy. Lily latched on immediately without a problem, my milk came in so soon, she never cried (until I ate broccoli soup that is).
I was well nourished. My mom was there to care for me and cook for me. My breakfasts arrived on a tray with a flower. Sweet rice cereal, toast with almond butter, sliced fresh fruit in a bowl. Lunches of homemade chicken noodle soup chocked full of kale and dinners of wild salmon, beets, yams, greens, and quinoa were on the menu. These are nourishing, breast milk-promoting foods.
New moms need to be taken care of. They need to feel safe and secure so they can do the most important thing in the world, care for their new baby.
My mom was there for all of my births and then stayed for weeks after my babies arrived, cooking and cleaning everyday. When our twins were born, she added “playing with the girls” to the list.
Rest, water, and good food are the three most important factors to get that milk flowing. There are certain foods that can help promote the flow of breast milk (though most of the evidence is anecdotal). My knowledge comes from my own experience and from the stories of other moms.
There are also foods that can cause problems with the new breastfeeding baby and should be avoided for the first 3 months or so. Below is my list of super breastfeeding foods for the new mom and foods to avoid.
Yesterday we got a call from a friend who just gave birth to a beautiful little baby girl. She had an emergency c-section and needed some help getting her breast milk to come in. It was my time to pay it forward. My friends came to my need for the first 4 months after my twins were born and brought meal after meal after meal (even with a number of food restrictions).
So the girls and I cooked up a pot of homemade chicken noodle soup, red lentil dal, brown rice, roasted yams, sesame halibut, a baby green salad with grated raw beets, ginger salad dressing, hummus, and cut raw veggies. Grace and I delivered the food just in time for dinner and were lucky enough to meet the sleepy new baby.

Good foods to nourish a post partum mom:

Plenty of purified water
Wild salmon
Organic chicken and vegetable soup with plenty of fresh herbs
Greens!! Fresh salad greens, dark leafy greens, and green smoothies
Sweet vegetables (yams, squash, carrots, beets)
Raw nuts and seeds (almonds, walnuts, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds)
Raw almond butter
Whole grains (quinoa, amaranth, oats, sweet brown rice, millet, teff)
Organic berries
Sea vegetables
Lentils
Carminative herbs and spices (cumin, cardamom, fenugreek, ginger, mint, fennel seeds)
Raspberry leaf tea (raspberry leaf along with fennel help to contract the uterus)
Nettle tea enriches and increases milk production
Healthy fats (avocado, extra virgin olive oil, virgin coconut oil, fresh flax or fish oil)
Foods to avoid during the post partum period (may cause upset in newborn baby):

Dairy products
Citrus fruit, especially juices
Peanuts
Heavily spiced foods
Beef
Raw garlic and onions
Cruciferous vegetables (broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage)
Wheat / Gluten
Refined soy products
Caffeine (coffee, tea, soda)
Chocolate
Prenatal vitamins (the iron may be irritating to baby)
I have included a recipe here that would also be nourishing for a new mom. It is also a great, simple recipe to make on busy days (and because I bet many of you reading this blog are not new moms!). If you have meals or foods that worked for you during this phase of life, please share!

Curried Lentil and Rice Casserole
I initially created this recipe to utilize the fresh turmeric I had on hand, but it also can be made with dried. If you work during the week, then try making this recipe on the weekend to have available for the week. The long baking time may not make this suitable for a quick weeknight meal. I use a stone casserole dish for this recipe. Portions can also be frozen into small containers for future use. Enjoy!
a few tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
1 medium onion, chopped
1 to 2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh ginger
1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh turmeric, or 1 teaspoon dried
2 teaspoons curry powder
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon ground coriander
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
2 teaspoons sea salt
4 carrots, chopped
1 1/2 cups french lentils
1 cup long grain brown rice
5 cups water
1 can coconut milk
Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
Saute onion in olive oil until soft, about 5 to 6 minutes. Add ginger, turmeric, spices, and salt. Continue to saute for another 2 minutes until fragrant.
Place onion-spice mixture into a large casserole dish. Add carrots, lentils, rice, water, and coconut milk. Mix together well. Cover and bake for 2 hours.
After 2 hours, turn oven temp up to 425 degrees F. Remove cover and cook for another 20 to 30 minutes to let excess liquid cook off. Stir and serve!

Foods for a Pre Post Natal Mom

Good foods to nourish a post partum mom:

Plenty of purified water
Wild salmon
Organic chicken and vegetable soup with plenty of fresh herbs
Greens!! Fresh salad greens, dark leafy greens, and green smoothies
Sweet vegetables (yams, squash, carrots, beets)
Raw nuts and seeds (almonds, walnuts, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds)
Raw almond butter
Whole grains (quinoa, amaranth, oats, sweet brown rice, millet, teff)
Organic berries
Sea vegetables
Lentils
Carminative herbs and spices (cumin, cardamom, fenugreek, ginger, mint, fennel seeds)
Raspberry leaf tea (raspberry leaf along with fennel help to contract the uterus)
Nettle tea enriches and increases milk production
Healthy fats (avocado, extra virgin olive oil, virgin coconut oil, fresh flax or fish oil)

 

Foods to avoid during the post partum period (may cause upset in newborn baby):

Dairy products
Citrus fruit, especially juices
Peanuts
Heavily spiced foods
Beef
Raw garlic and onions
Cruciferous vegetables (broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage)
Wheat / Gluten
Refined soy products
Caffeine (coffee, tea, soda)
Chocolate

Lamaze Based Childbirthing Classes in Vernon

Rooted Birth W/Emma Wheeler 

BIRTH WITH CONFIDENCE! Next session October 1,3,8,10, 6pm-8pm Cost $130

This Lamaze based childbirth preparation class focuses on birth as a NORMAL event. Be EMPOWERED, understand your choices and build confidence for this life changing event.

Topics that will be covered over three, two hour classes: Private or group classes available.

  • Identifying expectations, fears and belief systems about birth and providing tools to change those not conducive to a positive birth experience
  • Nutrition and exercise during pregnancy. Prenatal health and resources
  • What ACTUALLY happens during labour and birth?
  • Lamaze Six Healthy Birth Practices
  • Common labour diagnostics and interventions, and their risk benefit ratio
  • Finding your balance! Accepting responsibility and taking an active role in birth. How improved decision making can lead to a more positive birth experience as YOU define it.
  • The importance of your Partner and or Support Person.
  • Choosing a birth place where you feel SAFE and a birth team that respects YOUR philosophy
  • Cultural beliefs about pain and the FEAR PAIN CYCLE
  • Pain relief and comfort during labour – medical and natural
  • The power of the mind during labour. Working with your body not against it.
  • Fetal positioning
  • Vaginal Birth After Caesarean and Caesarean Births
  • Breastfeeding and Newborn Care
What is a Birth Doula?

Doula is a Greek word meaning “woman who serves.”

A Doula accompanies a woman during labour, providing non-clinical physical, emotional and informational support.

A woman´s needs during childbirth are complex. Aside from modern obstetrical care, and the love and support provided by her partner, a woman needs consistent, continuous comfort, reassurance, encouragement and respect. Every woman is different and so care needs to be individualized based on each woman´s circumstances and personal needs.

Doulas specialize in non-medical skills, and do not perform clinical tasks, or diagnose medical conditions. A Doula provides continuous support, from early labor, through birth, until the family is resting comfortably. The Doula offers help and advice on comfort measures such as pain management, breathing, relaxation, movement, positioning, and massage. She also assists families to gather the information they need to create a satisfying birth experience as they define it.

Doulas work in collaboration with midwives, nurses, physicians and birth partners. Experienced Doulas are considered to be part of the obstetrical team. Doulas attend home births and hospital births; medicated births and non-medicated births. Doulas may be the only support person for the mother, or may be part of a labor support team. A Doula is not a nurse, but is a trained childbirth professional that understands the labour and birth process, and can offer consistent, personalized care and support.

Numerous studies on Doula presence have shown:

 

Reduction in the length of labour by 25%

Reduction in pain medication use by 30%

Reduction in epidural requests by 60%

Reduction in the need for forceps by 40%

Reduction in oxytocin use by 40%

Reduction in cesarean section by 50%

*These statistics appear in “A Doula Makes the Difference” by Nugent in Mothering Magazine, March-April 1

Study cited in “The Doula” by Klaus in Childbirth Instructor Magazine, Spring 1995.

For more information:

http://www.dona.org/publications/position_paper_birth.php

What is a Postpartum Doula?

The postpartum doula is the extra pair of hands, quiet presence and shoulder to lean on in the days, weeks or even months after childbirth. Her primary role is to mother the mother by providing in-home essential, positive, not-judgmental support. By having a doula, mom, dad and siblings feel cared for while mom gets the much needed rest and recuperation she needs and deserves. A postpartum doula can reduce the chances for postpartum depression, help lower family stress, assist with sibling adjustment and provide mom with the confidence she needs and desires.

The doula’s role also includes providing physical support, baby care including; calming techniques, bathing, feeding, burping, diapering, holding, breastfeeding skills and support, sibling care, pet care, light housework, some meal prep and even errands. A doula is a new mother’s indispensable wealth of information and support during the postpartum time.

For more information on postpartum doula care for you and your family call Stacy Pavlov at Mother Me. 250-260-4120 or cell 250-306-0636 or email spavlov@telus.net.

 

Visit there Rooted Product Line for Mom’s, Babies and Families http://www.rootednaturalproductsshop.com/category_s/42.htm